Search Tags for mustseefilms

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Invaders from Mars. Directed by William Cameron Menzies. A young boy discovers an alien invasion behind his house. His parents, the police, even the military have their minds controlled by the aliens. The boy must fight back on his own to save his family and the world. A very influential science fiction film from the great 1950s era of scifi. Starring Jimmy Hunt. Screenplay by Richard Blake. Cinematography by John Seitz. Production Design by William Cameron Menzies. Art Direction by Boris Leven. Makeup by Ruby Felker, Gene Hibbs and Anatole Ribbins. Arthur Roberts is credited as Editorial Supervisor. Special Effects Photography by Jack Cosgrove.

12 Hours ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Empire of the Sun. Directed by Stephen Spielberg. Based on the autobiographical novel by J.G. Ballard and with a script written by Tom Stoppard, this film about a young English boy's life and death struggle to survive World War Two in a Japanese prisoner of war camp is an action-adventure, coming of age story with mythical and mystical elements. The view of war, of death, of violence and destruction, starvation and finally liberation are seen through the eyes of a young Jim, played by Christian Bale who showed the amazing potential of the actor he was to become. The film is an amazing visual experience which includes Jim witnessing the flash of the far-off atomic bomb which brings the war to a close for the world and for Jim. Empire of the Sun was nominated for six Oscars: Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Best Costume Design, Best Sound, Best Film Editing and Best Original Score.

1 Days ago

Comment from ShrimpCatCinema:

James White - 2015 - “I am not going to drink. And I am not going to smoke. I'm going to write and I'm going to meditate and I'm going to eat healthy and I'm going to swim and I'm going to work out and I'm going to write about all those feelings that are welled up inside me and when I get back I will get a place and a job but I need to go away. And when I come back I will be ready for life.” #shrimpcatcinema #mustseemovies #mustseemovie #mustseefilms #mustseefilm #movies #movienight #film #films #cinephile #cinema #filmlover #filmbuff #movielover #movielovers #moviebuff #quotes #moviequote #moviequotes #jameswhite #joshmond #christopherabbott #cynthianixon #scottmescudi #kidcudi #ronlivingston

1 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Beasts of the Southern Wild. Directed by Benh Zeitlin. Script by Lucy Alibar and Benh Zeitlin based on the play by Lucy Alibar. Amazing, devastated locations lend a 21st century post-catastrophe noir atmosphere to this film. The non-professional actors give the story a layer of realism in an unreal world. Add to that a layer of magical realism. A powerful and unique story and cinematic experience that takes the audience to a place they have never been, featuring a six year old lead character, Hushpuppy. The people on the island where she lives are waiting for a hurricane to hit. Pre-historic monsters are being released as the polar ice caps are melting. There are family feuds, fires, exploding levees. Hushpuppy goes on a search for her mother. The young actress Quvenzhané Wallis as Hushpuppy is something to see. At this level of fighting for survival, the elements of water, fire, air and earth are the weapons and the landscape these characters are dealing with. Cinematography by Ben Richardson. Film Editing by Crockett Doob and Affonso Goncalves. Production Design by Alex DiGerlando. Art Direction by Dawn Masi. Set Decoration by Erin Staub. Nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay.

2 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Good Morning. Directed by Yasujirô Ozu. A story about two young brothers stage a silence strike until their parents buy a television set. Ozu made films about Japanese family life and this is one of his later films. It is shot in beautiful colors and explores the Japanese middle class suburbs and their Post-World War Two fascination with Western-style consumer goods. Script by Kôgo Noda, Yasujirô Ozu. Cinematography by Yûharu Atsuta. Film Editing by Yoshiyasu Hamamura. Production Design and Art Direction by Tatsuo Hamada.

3 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Wee Willie Winkie. Directed by John Ford. During the dark economic years of the 1930s when America was struggling to get out of the grips of The Great Depression, the number one box office star was a little girl, Shirley Temple, literally the #1 box office draw in 935, 936, 937 and 938. Temple's characters in the movies at this time when she was under 0 years of age were full of tap dancing and singing and would change the course of events in a story by turning the cold, the hard, and the criminal elements with her cuteness and charm. In Wee Willie Winkie, director John Ford uses Temple to avoid a war in India between the British colonial powers and the local rebels. Based on the Rudyard Kipling story and featuring a large budget and elaborate sets for the time, and co-starring Victor McLaglen and Cesar Romero, C. Aubrey Smith and June Lang. By today's standards, Shirley Temple films are too much 'good ship lollipop' for the youth market, but at the time, America in the 930s, even adults were fascinated and charmed by her big screen persona and she helped the nation, through the soft propaganda of her films, to make the economic hard times and the impending war clouds a little easier to take. The screenplay was by Ernest Pascal and Julien Josephson. Cinematography by Arthur C. Miller. Film Editing by Walter Thompson. The Oscar nominate Art Direction by William Darling and David Hall.

4 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Hugo. Directed by Martin Scorsese. Both a children's tale and an homage to the history of movies. Actually, an homage to the history of the technology of movies. It's all here, from Magic Lantern Shows to 3D rendered cities and automatons. Hugo is a 12 year old boy living in the Paris Train Station in the early 1930s. He sets the clocks and travels through secret tunnels and passageways. He has a secret lab where he works on a secret left to him by his father. The train station has other secrets as well, of course involving movies, and all is revealed in this wonderful adventure, mystery film. Starring Asa Butterfield, Chloë Grace Moretz, Ben Kingsley, Sacha Baron Cohen, Jude Law, Christopher Lee. The screenplay is by John Logan based on the Brian Selzick book. Cinematography by Robert Richardson. Film Editing by Thelma Schoonmaker. Production Design by Dante Ferretti. The film was nominated for the Oscar for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Film Editing, Best Costume Design and Best Original Score. It won the Oscar for Cinematography, Sound Mixing, Sound Editing, Visual Effects and Art Direction.

5 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Whale Rider. Directed by Niki Caro. A story where an ancient culture clashes with the modern world. It is in the landscape, the characters, the language, everyday life. This is a story about a young Maori girl who wants to be a tribal leader when only first-born boys are considered. A film about tradition, family, destiny told through the struggle of a young girl going against the system, her family and the old ways. Keisha Castle-Hughes is outstanding as the young Paikea. The location and ocean cinematography is spectacular and give the audience a look into a unique tribal culture trying to maintain its traditions in the 21st century. Keisha Castle-Hughes was nominated for the Oscar for Best Actress in a Leading Role. Script by Niki Caro based on the book by Witi Ihimaera. Cinematography by Leon Narbey. Film Editing by David Coulson. Production Design by Grant Major. Art Direction by Grace Mok. Costume Design by Kirsty Cameron.

6 Days ago

Comment from ShrimpCatCinema:

6 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Germany: Year Zero. Directed by Roberto Rossellini. Starring a 12 year old boy, but definitely not a family friendly 'children’s movie'. Germany: Year Zero is a daring, mighty, hopeless cinematic look at the consequences of fascism, for society and the individual. The locations are surreal, yet impossibly real. The boy literally wanders through the rubble of post-war Berlin. This is Italian neorealism at its darkest, full of despair. Even the promise of youth is a hopeless one. Screenplay by Roberto Rossellini. Cinematography by Robert Juilliard.

7 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Mysteries of Lisbon. Directed by Raoul Ruiz. At over four hours in length, this epic film is about time, literally and figuratively. A mystery revolving around a young boy's parentage it is also about the art of cinema and storytelling. The story involves characters lives that pass one another and circle back, revealing more secrets and truths. There are dreams and memories and flashbacks within flashbacks. A unique cinematic experience and well worth the viewing effort. At the story's center is Pedro de Silva, a young orphan in Lisbon, Portugal played as a boy by João Arrais, and finally as a young man at the end by Afonso Pimental. Also starring Adriano Luz as a Priest, Father Dinis who also seems like the main character in the story at times, and Maria João Bastos as the boy's mother. Screenplay by Carlos Saboga based on the 1854 novel by Camilo Castelo Branco. Cinematography by André Szankowski. Film Editing by Carlos Madaleno and Valeria Sarmiento. Zrt Direction by Isabel Branco. Set Decoration by Paula Szabo.

8 Days ago

Comment from ShrimpCatCinema:

We Need To Talk About Kevin - 2011 - “It's like this: you wake and watch TV, get in your car and listen to the radio you go to your little jobs or little school, but you don't hear about that on the 6 o'clock news, why? 'Cause nothing is really happening, and you go home and watch some more TV and maybe it's a fun night and you go out and watch a movie. I mean it's got so bad that half the people on TV, inside the TV, they're watching TV. What are these people watching, people like me?” #shrimpcatcinema #mustseemovies #mustseemovie #mustseefilms #mustseefilm #movies #movienight #film #films #cinephile #cinema #filmlover #filmbuff #movielover #movielovers #moviebuff #quotes #moviequote #moviequotes #lynneramsay #tildaswinton #johncreilly #ezramiller

9 Days ago

Comment from James DeRosa:

Cinema From The Point of View of Children: Fanny and Alexander - Directed by Ingmar Bergman. An epic film, with Bergman chasing the novels of Proust with his artistry. The story of an early 20th century Swedish family at both its apex and its low points through the eyes of the children, brother and sister - Fanny and Alexander. Winner of the Oscar for Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Best Costume Design and nominated for Best Director, Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen and Best Foreign Language Film. Most reviews can't help but use the word sumptuous in their description and that is what is on the screen, a sumptuousness based on combined cinematic superpowers of Ingmar Berman's direction, Sven Nykvist's cinematography and a childhood's view of events through filters of magical realism. The screenplay is by Ingmar Bergman. Cinematography by Sven Nykvist. Film Editing by Sylvia Ingemarsson. Art Direction by Anna Asp. Set Decoration by Susanne Lingheim. Costume Design by Marik Vos-Lundh.

9 Days ago