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Comment from Laysha Duran:

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36 Minutes ago

Comment from Kristin:

1 Hours ago

Comment from Dr Hesh:

2009 forest hill block 1 riesling. Light perfume, crushed rocks, lavender bath salts. Delicate style of riesling. Green apple, lemon and soft stony mineral notes on the palate. Fine ribbons of acidity fluttering throughout. Ripping texture for such a fineboned elegant wine. Great southern #riesling often doesn’t get the kudos it deserves but this bottle shows it can mix it with the best of them. Still alive and kicking after 5 days in the fridge too.

1 Hours ago
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Comment from Pauline Tikvah:

I love 💗 us! I have the best boyfriend ever!

2 Hours ago

Vegan superfood shake everyday! Especially on days I know im going to enjoy some extra treats! 😉

2 Hours ago

Comment from Maddie Ivey:

3 Hours ago

The notifications are just blowing up, and I am so excited for all the newbies joining our team!!

3 Hours ago

"An ancient forest harmony of elegant boysenberry, cinnamon and sweet tobacco that is an echo back from a darker tar and brambleberry age." •• Frog’s Leap Zinfandel (2015) • On the sixteenth day of the half bottle advent calendar @brickswineco gave to us, a Zinfandel from Frog’s Leap in the Napa Valley. The winery was founded in 1981 by John Williams, who previously worked Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars. While its name is derived from the fact that a commercial frog farm precious occupied the estate’s property and an amusing play on the detail that Frog’s Leap borrowed grapes from Stag’s Leap to produce its early vintages, the current Frog’s leap viticultural offerings are no joke. The early implementation of organic farming practices (1988), avoidance of irrigation and adoption of renewal energy have helped set them apart from their peers. This differential doesn’t stop there, as the current wines attract regard and prestige, including this lovely Zinfandel. • The 2015 Frog’s Leap Zinfandel is a poised, composed and restrained arrangement of dark (brambleberry, boysenberry, dark cherry) and red (strawberry) fruit, ground spice (cinnamon, all spice, anise, white and black pepper) and secondary/tertiary (sweet tobacco, forest floor, walnut, tar, dark chocolate) flavours and aromas. On first taste, it is clear that this isn’t one of the big bottle monster Zins. This is something distinct, where the focus is more on finesse, yet the product is still dark and edgy. This finding led us down a path where we started asking some bigger questions. That search ended with the revelation that this is in fact a blend that includes Petite Sirah (19%) and a splash of Carignane (2%) – a very interesting style that was more popular in the 1940s/1950s. • This wine was a pleasant surprise and quite far from what we expected when we unwrapped a Napa Zin. We would be the first to admit that big, high octane flavours can be intriguing and fun. However, this bottle has led to some rethinking of our status quo and whether we need to dig a bit deeper to find out if other Napa Valley proprietors have taken a similar route with their Zins. • Sourced locally in Calgary from Bricks Wine Co.

3 Hours ago

Comment from Amanda Gerig-Sickles:

4 Hours ago